Tuesday, August 02, 2005

I have decided to include the papers I've written for my English 501 class here. Why not? I worked hard on them.

Greg Locascio
English 501
Summer 2005
Author Exercise

Charles Bukowski
(1991-2005)


Author’s life

The life of Charles Bukowski is steeped in semi-autobiographical lore. Bukowski often wrote about himself through the thinly veiled character of Henry Chinaski, a hard-driving, heavy-drinking, womanizing alcoholic ne’er-do-well. And although Bukowski also lived up to that description, he found time enough to write more than 60 books of fiction and poetry, and left behind enough unpublished materials that new works have been published nearly every year after his death in 1994.
Bukowski was born on August 16, 1920, in Andernach, Germany, the only child of Henry Charles Bukowski, Sr., and a German mother, Katherine Fett Bukowski. The family moved to Los Angeles in 1922, and except for some brief and well-documented forays to Philadelphia and New Orleans, Bukowski made L.A. his home for the rest of his life.
Bukowski claimed to be influenced by D.H. Lawrence, James Thurber, John Dos Passos and Sherwood Anderson. His direct, violent style of writing has often been compared to the poet Robinson Jeffers. Ernest Hemingway is mentioned more than any other author in Bukowski’s poetry. Bukowski emulated Hemingway’s exaggerated masculinity, love of violent sport (though Bukowski preferred boxing to bullfighting), and confronting death with honor and defiance.
Bukowski attended Los Angeles City College in the late 1930s and early 40s, but never graduated. He had only four poems published in the 40s, and did not start to write prolifically until the late 50s and early 60s. He lived the life of a homeless alcoholic and wandered the country for 10 years. His first chapbook, a collection of short poems, Flower, Fist and Bestial Wail, was published in 1960. And although Bukowski continued to work as a postal employee for 10 years, he was well on his way to literary fame. In the 1960s he published 10 books of poetry with 10 different publishers. His first novel, Post Office, catapulted him to such popular and critical success that he was able to quit his job and take on writing full-time.

Why Bukowski?

The first book I read by Bukowski was Run with the Hunted: A Charles Bukowski Reader, in the spring of 1994, around the same time Bukowski died. I’ve since read a book or two a year by him. Little did I know, before taking on this project, how large his corpus is. I think it is amazing that a raging mad alcoholic could produce such beautiful work in such abundance. Bukowski is one of the most imitated and well-known poets. And for good reason. His straightforward, honest style is accessible and easy to digest. Many find his subject matter and shocking style offensive.

Problems

The sheer volume of works by and about Bukowski made organization a difficult task. I found my sources using online resources: ABELL, LION, MLA Bibliography and the Humanities Index. I also checked out what was for sale by and about Bukowski at http://www.amazon.com/. Print resources I checked out were the Times Literary Supplement Index, the print version of the MLA bibliography, the Dictionary of Literary Biography, Contemporary Literary Criticism, Contemporary Authors and whatever books by Bukowski available at Founders Memorial Library. One major error I saw perpetuated throughout the citations is listing John Martin as the author of Sifting Through the Madness for the Word, The Line, The Way (2003). Martin edited this collection of Bukowski’s poems. Martin is the founder and publisher of Black Sparrow Press, a publishing company started in 1966 that owes its success and survival to Bukowski.

Still to do

The only incomplete section to my bibliography are periodical citations. I need to check the indexes of all the major North American and European newspapers for references to Bukowski. I would also like to include a list of movies that either Bukowski has appeared in or are based on Bukowski’s works.

What I’ve Learned

I’ve learned that attempting to do a bibliography on as well-known an author as Bukowski is a daunting task. If I had this assignment to do over again I would pick a lesser author and do a more complete and thorough bibliographical search.

Annotations

1. Kane, Thomas. “The Deaths of the Authors: Literary Celebrity and Automortography in Acker, Barthelme, Bukowski, and Carver’s Last Acts.” Literature Interpretation Theory (15:4) 2004, pp. 409-43.

Kane examines works produced by authors as they were dying, particularly Kathy Acker, Donald Barthelme, Charles Bukowski and Raymond Carver. Kane wrote that “they all write a kind of mortography: a writing that attempts to represent death” (Kane 409). The work of Bukowski’s that Kane analyzes is Pulp, Bukowski’s last novel that was published months after Bukowski died. Kane calls Pulp “a parody and homage to the detective genre” (414). One of the main characters in the novel is Lady Death, who hires detective Nick Belane to find author Louis-Ferdinand Celine in Los Angeles.

2. Masterson, Donald. “’Jeffers Is My God’: Charles Bukowski’s Commentary on Robinson Jeffers.” Jeffers Studies (5:2) Spring 2001, pp. 10-20.

Masterson examines the attraction that Charles Bukowski had for Robinson Jeffers. “Jeffer’s unmitigated poetic language, his splendid isolation, and even his dark, apocalyptic vision very much appealed to Bukowski, the self-acknowledged loner and tough guy” (Masterson 10). Masterson wrote that Bukowski and Jeffers shared a disdain for the literary establishment that “damaged Jeffers’s reputation and continually denied Bukowski access to the mainstream of American letters” (15). Masterson points out that Bukowski and Jeffers both used dinosaurs as a metaphor for humanity.

3. Locklin, Gerald. “Bukowski: A Life / The Buk Book: Musings on Charles Bukowski.” Review of Contemporary Fiction (18:2) 1998, p. 244.


Locklin, who also wrote a book about Charles Bukowski, Charles Bukowski: A Sure Bet, reviews two other books written about him, Neeli Cherkovski’s Bukowski: A Life, and Jim Christy’s The Buk Book: Musings on Charles Bukowski. Locklin writes that Cherkovski’s book is not “the definitive biography of Bukowski, but is a useful start and written in the clear, direct style of the master” (Locklin 244). His only criticism is that Cherkovski did not do more research on Bukowski’s youth. Locklin calls Christy’s book “brief, rollicking, sensationalistic, and, I suppose, in the worst of taste” (244).

4. Yezzi, David. Review of Open All Night: New Poems by Charles Bukowski. Poetry (178:2) May 2001, pp. 105-6.

Yezzi is no fan of Bukowski. He writes that if you are still a fan of Bukowski past the age of 30 “we had better part ways now” (Yezzi 105). “Persona presides over Bukowski’s work like a mischievous god – Loki with a taste for Pabst Blue Ribbon and foul-mouthed women” (105). The only credit Yezzi gives Bukowski is to write that he “tells some comical tall tales” (106). But he is mostly critical of Bukowski’s veiled persona Henry Chinaski, the self-parody of his blustery character and his “scabrous, narratives as verse” (106).

5. Campbell, James. Review of Sifting Through the Madness for the Word the Line the Way: New Poems by Charles Bukowski. Times Literary Supplement, July 18, 2003, p. 32.

Campbell reviews Sifting…, which is listed in the article by its more generic UK titles, New Poems, Book One and New Poems, Book Two. Campbell calls Bukowski’s novels “repetitive and long-winded, but at their best his short stories are perfectly judged in tone and content” (Campbell 32). He compares Bukowski’s narrative style to Raymond Chandler. Campbell writes that “admirers will welcome this posthumous offering, even in two volumes that might have easily been made into one volume at the same price” (32).

6. Smith, J.P. Review of Against the American Dream: Essays on Charles Bukowski by Harrison, Russell. Times Literary Supplement, March 24, 1995, p. 23.

Smith is critical of Harrison’s Against… and writes that “Harrison’s own reading is a distinctly academic, skewed and partial affair, focusing almost exclusively on the books of the 1970s and 80s…” (Smith 23). Smith disagrees with Harrison’s assertion that politics played a hidden role in Bukowski’s writings because “Harrison clearly doesn’t accept Bukowski’s own repeated statements to the contrary” (23). But Smith gives Harrison kudos for proving that Bukowski’s work can stand up to literary analysis.

7. Dobozy, Tamas. “In the Country of Contradictions the Hypocrite is King: Defining Dirty Realism in Charles Bukowski’s Factotum.” Modern Fiction Studies (Department of English, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN) (47: 1) 2001, pp. 43-68.

Of all the seven secondary works I chose to annotate, Dobozy’s article is the most scholarly and difficult to decipher. Dobozy writes that Bukowski’s Factotum provides “a model of subversive operativity within postindustrial capital…” (Dobozy 44). Can one project a sophisticated post-modernistic ethos on Bukowski’s works, because he certainly did not write with the intention to criticize post-industrial capital. Dobozy tries, but whatever success he achieves in connecting Bukowski’s writing to postmodern thought is lost in his murky, posturing, overly-intellectual style.

Bibliography

The bibliography is listed chronologically, starting with a primary bibliography of the author. Bukowski wrote novels, poetry, reviews and forewards/prefaces. Subject headings in the secondary bibliography include: articles, books, literary reference materials, periodicals and obituaries. Citations in bold are included in my annotations.
Although Charles Bukowski died on March 9, 1994, works by him have been published posthumously nearly every year since his death. The only problems I encountered were trying to find all the periodicals listings. I will need more time to list every mention of the author in newspapers and magazines.

Primary bibliography

A1. Bukowski, Charles. In the Shadow of the Rose. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1991.

A2. Bukowski, Charles. “Pen and Drink.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (4), pp. 22-32, previously published in Weekend Guardian, Dec. 14-15, 1991.
A3. Bukowski, Charles. “The Trash Can.” Literary Review: An International Journal of Contemporary Writing (35:3) Spring 1992, p. 310.

A4. Bukowski, Charles. “After Reading a Certain Poet.” Midwest Quarterly (33) Summer 1992, p. 405.

A5. Bukowski, Charles. “Everywhere, Everywhere.” Midwest Quarterly (33) Summer 1992, p. 406.

A6. Bukowski, Charles. “The Modern Life.” Antaeus (69) Autumn 1992, p. 69.

A7. Bukowski, Charles. “Bach, Come Back.” Antaeus (69) Autumn 1992, p. 70-1.

A8. Bukowski, Charles. “The Crowd.” Midwest Quarterly (34), Autumn 1992, pp. 60-1.

A9. Bukowski, Charles. The Last Night of the Earth Poems. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1992.

A10. Bukowski, Charles. “Not Much Singing.” American Poetry Review (22) May/June 1993, p. 46.

A11. Bukowski, Charles. “A New War.” Prairie Schooner (67) Fall 1993, p. 167.

A12. Bukowski, Charles. “The Laughing Heart.” Prairie Schooner (67) Fall 1993, p. 168.

A13. Bukowski, Charles. “The Depression Kid.” Midwest Quarterly (34) Winter 1993, p. 209-11.

A14. Bukowski, Charles. (author of preface) Fante, John. Ask the Dust. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1993.

A15. Bukowski, Charles. Screams from the Balcony: Selected Letters 1960-1970 (Volume 1) Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1993.

A16. Bukowski, Charles. Run with the Hunted: A Charles Bukowski Reader. Ed. John Martin. New York: Harper Collins, 1993.

A17. Bukowski, Charles. “Musings.” Antaeus (73/74) Spring 1994, pp. 77-9.

A18. Bukowski, Charles. “Cold Summer.” Poetry (164:4) July 1994.

A19. Bukowski, Charles. “Between the Earthquake, the Volcano and the Leopard.” Antaeus (75/76) Autumn 1994, pp. 241-6.


A20. Bukowski, Charles. Pulp. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1994.

A21. Bukowski, Charles (author of foreward) Richmond, Steve. Hitler Painted Roses. Northville, MI: Sun Dog Press, 1994.

A22. Bukowski, Charles. Living on Luck: Selected Letters 1960s-1970s (Volume 2) Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1995.

A23. Bukowski, Charles (with Kenneth Price). Heat Wave. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Graphic Arts, 1995.

A24. Bukowski, Charles. Confession of a Coward. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1995.

A25. Bukowski, Charles. “All Right, So Camus Had to Give Speeches Before the Academies and Get His Ass Killed in a Car-Wreck.” Chicago Review (42: 3-4) 1996, pp. 118-19.

A26. Bukowski, Charles. Betting on the Muse: Poems and Stories. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1996.

A27. Bukowski, Charles. Bone Palace Ballet: New Poems. New York: Ecco, 1997.

A28. Bukowski, Charles. The Captain is Out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship. New York: Ecco, 1998.

A29. Bukowski, Charles. Reach for the Sun: Selected Letters 1978-1994 (Volume 3). New York: Ecco, 1999.

A30. Bukowski, Charles. What Matters Most Is How Well You Walk Through the Fire: New Poems. New York: Ecco, 1999.

A31. Bukowski, Charles. Open All Night: New Poems. New York: Ecco, 2000.

A32. Bukowski, Charles. “Little Poem.” Ohio Review (62/63) 2001, p. 100-1. Reprint from (5) 1973.

A33. Bukowski, Charles. The Night Torn Mad with Footsteps: New Poems. New York: Ecco, 2001.

A34. Bukowski, Charles. Sifting Through the Madness for the Word the Line the Way: New Poems. Ed. Martin, John. (Published in UK as New Poems: Book One and New Poems: Book Two). New York: Ecco; London: Virgin, 2003. Two volumes.

A35. Bukowski, Charles. The Flash of Lightning Behind the Mountain. New York: Ecco, 2004.

A36. Bukowski, Charles. Slouching Toward Nirvana. New York: Ecco, 2005.

Secondary Bibliography

Articles

B1. Mamchur, C. “On a Glider to Hell?” Prairie Journal of Canadian Literature (17) 1991, pp. 32-7.

B2. Robbins, Doren. “Drinking Wine in the Slaughterhouse with Septuagenarian Stew: For Bukowski at 71.” Onthebus (3: 2/4: 1) 1991, 282-5.

B3. Smith, Jules. Review of Hank: The Life of Charles Bukowski by Neeli Cherkovski. Times Literary Supplement, Nov. 29, 1991, p. 25.

B4. Girlanda, Elio. “Hollywood Story.” Cinema Studio (5-6) Jan.-June 1992, pp. 74-5.

B5. Olson, Ted. “Two Poets Listening to Life: Bukowski and Jeffers.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (4) 1992, pp. 2-8.

B6. Wakoski, Diane. “It Is Instructive to Look at the Way Attitudes Towards Charles Bukowski’s Poetry Have Evolved, but Not Changed.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 4-7.

B7. Flanagan, Bob. “On Bukowski & His Paintings.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (4) 1992, pp. 9-11.

B8. Harrison, Russell T. “A Brooklyn Madness.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 10-14.

B9. Weddle, Jeff. “Bukowski the Good: A Celebration of ‘One for the Shoeshine Man.’” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 19-25.
“Recent Writing by or about Charles Bukowski (and other Stuff).” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (4), p. 21.

B10. Calonne, David Stephen. “Two on the Trapeze: Charles Bukowski and William Saroyan.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 26-35.

B11. Smith, Joan Jobe. “Charles Bukowski: The Poet as Entertainment.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (4) 1992, pp. 35-41.

B12. Weddle, Laura T. “The Healing Power of Art: Bukowski’s ‘The Twins.’” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 36-9.

B13. Hart, Hugh. “Champion Loser: The Life and Hard Times of Charles Bukowski.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 44-7.

B14. Barker, David. “Charles Bukowski: The First Quarter Century: A Bibliographic Survey of His Early Publications, 1944-1969.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (5-6) 1992, pp. 51-61.

B15. Woods, William Walker. “Rhetorical Theory Concerning the Making of a Writer in the Poetry of Charles Bukowski,” Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Texas Woman’s University, 1992 [Abstract in Dissertation Abstracts International (54) 1993, 936a].

B16. Wong, Richard. “The Day I Met Bukowski.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 5-6.

B17. Anderson, Duane. “A Bukowski Wish List.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 7-8.

B18. “Recent Writings By or About Charles Bukowski,” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 11-14.

B19. Coyne, Kevin. “A Poetry Slam Review.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 17-18.

B20. Harrison, Russell T. “The Letters of Charles Bukowski.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 8-9, 17-29.

B21. Schwada, Jim. “Man the Humping Guns: The Roominghouse Madrigals.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 21-3.

B22. Kaul, Bill. “Charles Bukowski: Some Facts.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 25-7.

B23. Basinski, Michael. “20 Tanks From Kasseldown.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 28-9.

B24. Sandrag, Robert. “Bukowski in Mistranslation.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 8-9, 40-2.

B25. Basinski, Michael. “His Wife, the Painter, The Old Man on the Corner, and Waste Basket.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 40-3.

B26. Basinski, Michael. “Charles Bukowski: In the American Grain and Other Matters.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 8-9, 52-6.

B27. Weddle, Jeff. “The Day It Snowed in L.A.” Sure: The Charles Bukowski Newsletter (7) 1993, pp. 55-7.

B28. Anonymous, “Charles Bukowski: An Unlikely Jeffers Tribute.” Robinson Jeffers Newsletter (90) 1994, pp. 6-7.

B29. Ziegler, Robert. “From a Charles Bukowski Reader.” Notes on Contemporary Literature (25:4) 1995, pp. 13-14.

B30. Smith, J.P. Review of Against the American Dream: Essays on Charles Bukowski by Harrison, Russell. Times Literary Supplement, March 24, 1995, p. 23.

B31. Sward, Robert. Review of The Bukowski/Purdy Letters: A Decade of Dialogue, 1964-1974 by Seamus Cooney. American Book Review (16:6) 1995, pp. 17-18.

B32. Madigan, Andrew J. “What Fame Is: Bukowski’s Exploration of Self.” Journal of American Studies (30:3) 1996, pp. 447-61.

B33. Charlson, David Jon. “Charles Bukowski: Autobiographer, Gender Critic, Iconoclast.” Doctoral dissertation, University of Kansas, 1995. Dissertation Abstracts International, Section A: The Humanities and Social Sciences (56:11) May 1996, pp. 4394-5.

B34. Halliburton, Lloyd. “Corrington, Bukowski and the Loujon Press.” Louisiana Literature: A Review of Literature and Humanities (13:1) Spring 1996, pp. 103-9.

B35. Madigan, Andrew J. “Bukowski’s ‘I Met a Genius.’” Explicator (55:4) 1997, 232-3.

B36. Madigan, Andrew J. “Countersystem Analysis and Social Criticism in the
B37. Works of Charles Bukowski, Jack Kerouac, and J.D. Salinger.” Doctoral dissertation, Saint Louis University, 1996. Dissertation Abstracts International, Section A: The Humanities and Social Sciences (57:7) Jan. 1997, p. 3022.

B38. Locklin, Gerald. “Charles Bukowski.” In: Westbrook, Max (preface); Flores, Dan (chronology); Updating the Literary West. Fort Worth, TX: Western Literature Association, in association with Texas Christian University Press, 1997.

B39. Varner, Paul. Review of Charles Bukowski: A Sure Bet by Gerald Locklin. Western American Literature (33:1) 1998, pp. 98-9.

B40. Locklin, Gerald. “Bukowski: A Life / The Buk Book: Musings on Charles Bukowski.” Review of Contemporary Fiction (18:2) 1998, p. 244.

B41. Locklin, Gerald. Review of The Captain is out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship by Charles Bukowski. Review of Contemporary Fiction (18:3) 1998, pp. 237-8.

B42. Cherkovski, Neeli. “Bukowski on Jeffers: Excerpts from a Memoir.” Jeffers Studies (2:1) Winter 1998, pp. 15-18.

B43. McKee, Louis. Review of The Charles Bukowski Second Coming Years by A.D. Winans. Onthebus (15/16), 1999, 276-8.

B44. Baker, Phil. Review of Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life by Howard Sounes. Times Literary Supplement, Jan. 15, 1999, p. 9.

B45.Martin, Justin. “Black Sparrow Press: Bukowski Was Just the First.” Poets & Writers (27:3) May/June 1999, pp. 40-3.

B46. Cook, Bruce. Review of Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life by Howard Sounes, Book World, July 11, 1999, p. 6.

B47. Gargan, William. Review of Reach for the Sun: Selected Letters, 1978-1994. Library Journal, July 1999, p. 89.

B48. McKee, Louis. Review of Charles Bukowski: A Sure Bet by Gerald Locklin. Onthebus (15/16) 1999, pp. 276-8.

B49. McKee, Louis. Review of Spinning Off Bukowski by Steve Richmond. Onthebus (15/16) 1999, pp. 276-8.

B50. Watson, Martha; Thomas, John D. Review of Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life by Howard Sounes. Biography (22:4) Fall 1999, p. 638.

B51. Donnelly, Ben. Review of Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life by Howard Sounes. Review of Contemporary Fiction (19:3) Fall 1999, p. 180.

B52. Brantingham, John Michael; Haven, Mike. “Gerald Locklin’s Influence on Charles Bukowski’s Pulp.” Notes on Contemporary Literature (30:2) 2000, pp. 4-6.

B53. Brantingham, John; Haven, Mick. “Cracking Bukowski’s Number Code in Pulp.” Notes on Contemporary Literature (30:1) 2000, pp. 7-8.

B54. Spitzer, Mark. Review of Charles Bukowski: Laughing with the Gods: Interview Transcription by Fernando Pivano and Simona Viciani by Fernando Pivano. Cybercorpse (7) 2000.

B55. Yusti, Carlos. “Bukowski, la literature chatarra.” Enfocarte.com: Revista de Arte y Cultura, October 2000.

B56. Friedman, Norman. “Locklin, the Beats, and Bukowski.” Spring: The Journal of the E.E. Cummings Society (10), 2001. pp. 128-37.

B57. Brantingham, John Michael; Haven, Mike. “Wish They All Could Be California Writers.” Spring: The Journal of the E.E. Cummings Society (10) 2001, pp. 112-17.

B58. Masterson, Donald. “’Jeffers Is My God’: Charles Bukowski’s Commentary on Robinson Jeffers.” Jeffers Studies (5:2) Spring 2001, pp. 10-20.

B59. Dobozy, Tamas. “In the Country of Contradictions the Hypocrite is King: Defining Dirty Realism in Charles Bukowski’s Factotum.” Modern Fiction Studies (Department of English, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN) (47: 1) 2001, pp. 43-68.

B60. Yezzi, David. Review of Open All Night: New Poems by Charles Bukowski. Poetry (178:2) May 2001, pp. 105-6.

B61. Fox, Hugh. Review of The Holy Grail: Charles Bukowski and the Second Coming Revolution by A.D. Winans. Small Press Review/ Small Magazine Review (34: 7/8) 2002, pp. 1,4.

B62. Grapes, Jack. “Tender Agonies: Letters of Charles Bukowski.” Onthebus (17/18) 2002, 20-7.

B63. Campbell, James. Review of Sifting Through the Madness for the Word the Line the Way: New Poems by Charles Bukowski. Times Literary Supplement, July 18, 2003, p. 32.

B64. Encke, Jeffrey. “Run of the Mill Lunacy.” Journal of American Studies (37:1) April 2003, p. 47-58.

B65. Kane, Thomas. “The Deaths of the Authors: Literary Celebrity and Automortography in Acker, Barthelme, Bukowski, and Carver’s Last Acts.” Literature Interpretation Theory (15:4) 2004, pp. 409-43.

B66. Brandt, Kenneth K. “Saying What He Means: Linguistic Proportion in the Poetry of Charles Bukowski.” Notes on Contemporary Literature (34:4) 2004, pp. 12-15.

B67. Economou, George. Review of Sifting Through the Madness for the Word the Line the Way: New Poems by Charles Bukowski. World Literature Today: A Literary Quarterly of the University of Oklahoma (Norman) (78: 3 / 4) Sep.-Dec. 2004, pp. 97-8.

B68. Kirsch, Adam. “Smashed: The Pulp Poetry of Charles Bukowski.” New Yorker (81:4) March 14, 2005, pp. 132-6.

Books

C1. Cherkovski, Neeli. Hank: The Life of Charles Bukowski. New York: Random House, 1991.

C2. Cooney, Seamus. Screams from the Balcony: Selected Letters, 1960-1970. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1993.

C3. Harrison, Russell. Against the American Dream: Essays on Charles Bukowski. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1994.

C4. Cooney, Seamus. Living on Luck: Selected Letters, 1960s-1970s: vol. 2. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1995.

C5. Locklin, Gerald. Charles Bukowski: A Sure Bet. Sudbury, MA: Water Row Press, 1996.

C6. Joyce, William. Miller, Bukowski & Their Enemies: Essays on Contemporary Culture. Greensboro, NC: Avisson Press, 1996.

C7. Richmond, Steve. Spinning Off Bukowski. Northville, MI: Sun Dog Press, 1996.

C8. Winans, A.D. The Charles Bukowski Second Coming Years. Coventry: Beat Scene Press, 1996.

C9. Christy, Jim. The Buk Book: Musings on Charles Bukowski. Toronto: ECW Press; London: Turnaround, 1997.

C10. Brewer, Gay. Charles Bukowski. New York: Twayne; London: Prentice Hall, 1997.

C11. Sounes, Howard. Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life. Edinburgh: Rebel; New York: Grove Press, 1998.

C12. Krumhansl, Aaron. A Descriptive Bibliography of the Primary Publications of Charles Bukowski. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 1999.

C13. Pivano, Fernando. Charles Bukowski: Laughing with the Gods: Interview Transcription by Fernando Pivano and Simona Viciani. Northville, MI: Sun Dog Press, 2000.

C14. Sounes, Howard. Bukowski in Pictures. Edinburgh, Scotland: Rebel, 2000.

C15. Moore, Steven. Beerspit Night and Cursing: The Correspondence of Charles Bukowski and Sheri Martinelli, 1960-1967. Santa Rosa, CA: Black Sparrow Press, 2001.

C16. Norse, Harold. Fly Like a Bat out of Hell: The Letters of Harold Norse and Charles Bukowski. New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press; London: Orion, 2002.

C17. Winans, A.D. The Holy Grail: Charles Bukowski and the Second Coming Revolution. Paradise, CA: Dustbooks, 2002.

C18. Duval, Jean-Francois. Bukowski and the Beats: A Commentary on the Beat Generation; Followed By An Evening at Buk’s Place: An Interview with Charles Bukowski. Transcripted by Alison Ardron. Northville, MI: Sun Dog Press, 2002.

C19. Calonne, David Stephen. Sunlight Here I Am: Interviews and Encounters, 1963-1993. Northville, MI: Sun Dog Press, 2003.

Periodicals

(arranged alphabetically by title)

D1. Booklist, Feb. 15, 1993, p. 1010; Jan. 15, 1994, p. 893; May 15, 1996, p. 1563; May 15, 1998, Mike Tribby, review of The Captain is out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship, p. 1587; Dec. 15, 1999, review of What Matters Most Is How Well You Walk Through the Fire, p. 752; Dec. 1, 2000, Ray Olson, review of Open All Night: New Poems, p. 689.

D2. Bookwatch, July 1998, review of The Captain is out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship, p. 1.

D3. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 28, 1994, p. 6.

D4. Kliatt, Jan. 1998, review of Bone Palace Ballet, p. 21.

D5. Los Angeles Magazine, June 1994, p. 76.

D6. Los Angeles Times Book Review, Oct. 30, 1994, p. 11.

D7. New Statesman & Society, June 17, 1994, p. 37.

D8. New York Times Book Review, June 5, 1994, p. 50; Dec. 26, 1999, review of What Matters Most is How Well You Walk Through the Fire, p. 16; Jan. 7, 2001, Kera Bolonik, review of Open All Night: New Poems, p. 18.

D9. Publisher’s Weekly, March 29, 1993, p. 34; Dec. 20, 1993, p. 62; April 29, 1996, p. 66; April 20, 1998, review of The Captain is out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship, p. 60; Dec. 6, 1999, review of What Matters Most is How Well You Walk Through the Fire, p. 74; Nov. 20, 2000, review of Open All Night: New Poems, p. 65.

D10. Washington Post Book World, July 14, 1994, p. 2.

Literary reference materials

(alphabetically by title)

E1. Contemporary Literary Criticism. Detroit: Gale, Volume 82, 1994, p. 1-30; Volume 108, 1998, pp. 63-117.

E2. Contemporary Authors New Revision Series. Detroit: Gale, Volume 40, 1993, pp. 45-9; Volume 62, 1998, pp. 63-9

E3. Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 130: American Short Story Writers Since World War II. Detroit: Gale, 1993, pp. 56-64. Volume 169: American Poets Since World War II, Fifth Series. Detroit: Gale, 1996, pp. 63-77.


Obituaries
(alphabetically by title)

F1. Chicago Tribune, March 11, 1994, p. 12.

F2. Entertainment Weekly, March 25, 1994, p. 49.

F3. Facts on File, March 17, 1994, p. 196.

F4. Los Angeles Times, March 10, 1994, p. 1, 24.

F5. New York Times, March 11, 1994, p. B9.

F6. Time, March 21, 1994, p. 26.

F7. Times (London), March 11, 1994, p. 67.

F8. Variety, March 14, 1994, p. 67.

F9. Washington Post, March 11, 1994, p. B5.